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Accessory Dwelling Units / In-Law Units Encouraged by New Laws

March 8, 2017 Leave a comment

An ADU, previously known as “in-law” units or “granny flats,” are additional living spaces on single-family lots that have a separate kitchen, bathroom, and exterior access independent of the primary residence. Two bills, SB-1069 and AB-2299 were recently enacted amending provisions of the Government Code, and generally encouraging the building of ADU’s.  These bills require local governments to permit property owners to build ADUs in single-family and multifamily residential zones, so long as the ADU meets specific standards defined in the bill. Those standards include, but are not limited to, parking, height, setback, lot coverage, landscape, architectural review, and maximum size of a unit. As long as the standards are met, local cities and counties are required to approve the ADU. Property owners, who are interested in adding an ADU to their property, should consult with their local building or planning department and an attorney.

– All Rights Reserved © 2017 by Michael L. Mau, Esq. and The Mau Law Firm

Architects owe a Duty of Care to Future Homeowners

July 7, 2014 Leave a comment

In Beacon Residential Community Assoc. v. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (No. S208173), the California Supreme Court expanded the potential liability of architects who are the primary designers of a residential building, typically a condominium development.  The Supreme Court held that an architect owes a duty of care to future homeowners in the design of a residential building where, the architect is a principal architect on the project, that is, the architect, in providing professional design services, is not subordinate to other design professionals. The duty of care extends to such architects even when they do not actually build the project or exercise ultimate control over construction.

– All Rights Reserved © 2014 by Michael L. Mau, Esq. and The Mau Law Firm